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% ons these deve p developme developments. u.s. education, failing grades for our schools. globally we are now on the lower end of the curve. below average in math and science. this is a competitive crisis for american business. why are we not succeeding here? what's being done to fix it? two leading people on the american education charge. first, though, to sue at the nyse. >> thank you very much. a rough day for the dow jones industrial average. we are off of our lows but still up 21% this year. right now the dow jones industrial average down 104 points. transports have been on a huge tear, down today, but up 35% year to date. the s&p also in the red today. it's up 25% this year. it's down just 7.3 points today. similar story at the nasdaq, up 27% year to date. let's bring in bp and kenny polcari, director o'neill's security and cnbc market analyst. we've been talking about the pivot point in the market, the turn in the market when it would come. is this what we're seeing today? >> i think it feels like. the only thing you have to be careful of, not a the lo of volume. we've only don
in the workshop and educators can get lesson plans to use in the classroom. >> you don't use sugar for any of these things, right? sugar has seen a big decrease in the last five weeks. sugar prices have dropped pretty steadily in the last five weeks. there's nothing surprisingly in the 12 days that uses sugar, right? >> if you remember last year, becky, we had the drought in the summertime which drove up food prices and grain prices. >> right. right. >> which caused the bird costs to go up. this year both energy and food prices are down. >> we were going to play a little music or something so the total price is, did you tell us that already, $27,993.17. up 7.7% this year, joe. >> 7.7. inflation. all right, jim. thank you. >> good to see you. happy holidays. >>> folks, it is cyber monday. that's when people return to work and do some shopping online. we're going to talk about ecommerce prospects when "squawk box" comes right back ♪ ♪ the most wonderful time of the year ♪ capital to make it happen? without the thinking that makes it real? what's a vision without the expertise to execut
a wage when they're trying to earn a living. as we have more older and highly educated people in that sector. >> if you had a perfect system in a test tube, though, and it's not that way, it just seems to me, if you can find someone not working that is willing to work at whatever the market price is, you can fill enough jobs that you want, it seems like, you know, if you're true to economics, it seems like you would never set anything. you'd want the market. >> this is an idea that says -- >> and the other thing, jared, is it not this simple? a company can either have 100 people at $8 an hour or 80 people at $10 an hour. >> it's definitely not that simple. let me respond to both of those. i thought it was gary who gave a good list of the way that minimum wages -- the increases tend to get absorbed. and that's why, joe, your second point i think is wrong. he talked about profits, he talked about prices. there's also efficiency gains. clearly, the absorption mechanism isn't just on the employment margin. that's why we get those results i've been describing through our discussion
. a low-cast accredited university that was named one of the most disruptive in education. "squawk" will be right back. [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to be the best. and at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the mercedes-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease the 2014 e350 for $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. a confident retirement. those dreams, there's just no way we're going to let them die. ♪ like they helped millions of others. by listening. planning. working one on one. that's what ameriprise financial does. that's what they can do with you. that's how ameriprise puts more within reach. ♪ >>> looks like yesterday's trading sort of. nothing happening. but you never know. and coming up, our higher learning series continues today with two men disrupting the world of online education. the ceo of university now and the president of ed x joins us after the break. i love having a free checked bag with my unit
personal adversity and committed to philanthropy and higher education. you know who else got one this year? class of 2014, coty at honey well and jerry jones, owner of the cowboys. they're in great company with you. congratulations. that's a real honor. it's a big deal for the class of 2014. >> well, thank you for saying that joe. it is an honor. i admire the ratio society greatly. they take individuals andle challenge circumstances and give them an opportunity through scholarships to change their life through education. and to join companies not only those you mentioned but most importantly our previous winner our founder. i never thought it would happen in my lifetime. >> you didn't get it yet, did you? when do they do it? >> no. the event is in april in washington d.c. >> it's a big deal. >> it's quite something. i look forward to hit. >> can congratulations. we'll check back with you on. that think about it if you see the tape. i look good in that suit. >> actually joe, when i see the ron burgundy commercial, i do think of you. i don't know why. >> i think that's a compliment? thanks m
paying? >> well, a job that's better paying calls for a higher education. and, you know, if you don't have that, then it's hard to get a better paying job. and, you know, a lot of people cannot get a better education because of them having to work and take care of a home. >> and, mary, i understand you're also taking care of a daughter with a heart condition, two grandchildren. how old are you, if you don't mind me asking? >> i'm 59 years old. >> and, mary, i imagine then trying to move up in this position, as you say, without the access to education that could enable you to get another job is a huge problem potentially. when you began working all of those years ago, did you have a different outcome in mind? >> yes, i did. i never thought it would get worse. i've always felt that it would get better instead of worse. but it has made a turnaround. >> i want to also, mary, just give you -- let you listen to an interview we had yesterday with jamie richardson. he's a white castle vice president. we said to him, jamie, what would happen if the minimum wage were raised to $15 an hour for
're not going to hurt the budgets of education because we are an education modulated government and of course health and welfare. these are the budgets that we are going to try to keep the way they are. we think there's some room for some cuts in the defense budget. not too much unfortunately. we live in a very shaky neighborhood it's very detailed. in this god is in the details. >> the federal reserve is now saying that this is over and that's causing a great deal of volatility in the markets. how will that impact the israeli market? >> first, foremost, 26, 27% of these exports are to the united states so this is immediate. it's a good thing that we have this separated. i mean, 26% to the united states, 30 something to europe and the rest to the far east and the rest of the world which means we are balancing the way that one area of the world is in trouble or collapsing or the second 2008 is happening, we are better protected against this, but the united states is the biggest sister. whatever happens there influences us. of course, we were following bernanke's policies and we, like the rest
. i'm just trying to safe you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you, but to educate you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. leave it to twitter to produce the ultimate question that is defining this stock market. including today where the dow sank 78 points. s&p back 7.2%. at jim query, would you buy amazon here? my quick response, two very different questions, yes and no. that's right. yes, i would buy amazon. no, it's not worth $400. welcome to the world of bull market discipline. the discipline to buy stocks that aren't cheap but are right. a discipline that will be tested in the next few days. at last because of today's last hour 7 sell-off -- >> sell, sell, sell! >> that shook people out of their complacency. i'm talking about the rigger to recognize what the market actually wants, though, not necessarily what you want. the dichotomy says you would rather have a portfolio that is hated and making money than be bound by concerns that may not be as relevant as they should be. let's start with amazon, which hit at an all-time high today, $399 before being repelled along wit
for their grandkids' educations... they chose a partner to help manage their wealth... one whose insights, solutions, and approach have been relied on for over 200 years. that's the value of trusted connections. that's u.s. trust. [ bagpipes and drums playing over ] [ music transitions to rock ] make it happen with the all-new fidelity active trader pro. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades when you open an account. yep. got all the cozies. [ grandma ] with new fedex one rate, i could fill a box and ship it for one flat rate. so i knit until it was full. you'd be crazy not to. is that nana? [ male announcer ] fedex one rate. simple, flat rate shipping with the reliability of fedex. >>> triple digit advance of almost 180 points. trading action with bob pisani, he joins me here at post 9 on the floor of the nyse. we posed the question this morning, is good news finally good news. >> yeah. >> the market is acting as if it is. but it's an interesting reaction. >> it's a surprising reaction. first of all not the number that's sdprising. a lot of peo
the young and vibrant to want to go on the exchange. adds people are more educated about it that's what will happen. that's what we're hoping for for all of this country to lower health care costs. >> i'm intrigued by your first answer where you essentially laid out some of the objectives of the affordable care act. then you said but i'm not too worried about details of the website. isn't that precisely the problem with all of this right now? the objectives were clearly laid out but the details were not well planned. for example, the famous promise made by the president that if you like your insurance plan you get to keep your insurance plan. when, in fact, for 5%, that's not the case. and now people are getting those cancellation notices. the details were not that well thought out. >> agreed that the details did not come to fruition once we began the website. let's be clear, 20% of this country's not based on a website. we'll get the website right. if it's right 30 days later, then we'll still get it right. they had a million go through yesterday healthcare.gov, th
been an absolutely priceless financial education. >> you're terrific. thank you so much. i think you'll like this new book coming out in a couple of weeks. >> caller: from your book "getting back to even" i'm doing the stock replacement strategy. >> it's very complicated, but that's great. >> caller: i have december calls on disney. i have not shorted the common yet, which i should have done last week, i had great gains and i lost a lot of the gains this week. when should i short disney? >> i don't want you to. we'll get a deeper month out a few months from now. the strategy is complicated in getting back to even. disney is a buy, not a sell. i don't want you fooling around with it. when it does spike $1.50 to $2 it will flatten out later. but i think you're fine right now. steve in california. >> caller: hello there, jim. >> hey, steve. >> caller: thank you to all the home gamers from all the home gamers for making this holiday season a prosperous one. >> yes. i want everyone to do well. that's my game plan. >> caller: i appreciate you helping us make money. i love the fact you give
in february to move into education or philanthropy he says. if he'd be willing, he would be a really big get for someone. kelly? >> i had no idea -- inventory is high, inventory of ceo candidates. courtney reagan back at headquarters. thank you. while gap isn't looking for a new ceo, they might want to look for a new strategy. several wall street firms downgrading the stock. >> let's talk about it. adrian, thinks this room has run to run while ann thinks gap will go nowhere from here. ladies, thank you for joining us. adrian, make the case for gap right now. >> the case for gap really is about global growth. in the near term, absolutely we agree that it's very promotional. there is a lot of pressure on march margins. we actually think in the near term, that is something to be the status quo. but we like the global growth prospects. the company has yet to really expand globally. opened its first old navy store in japan in 2012. there's a lot of runway for this company longer term. >> at the same time, even coming out with a better than expected november sales number, pam, we've got the shares
or the department of education. and as we reported in 2009, most of those bills were paid for by the government with few or no questions asked and with an estimated 30% of the treatments having no meaningful impact. >> ms. klish, it's dr. byock. >> marcia klish is either being saved by medical technology or being prevented from dying a natural death. >> we're just here checking on you. >> she's been unconscious in the intensive care unit at dartmouth hitchcock medical center in lebanon, new hampshire, for the better part of a week. one of her doctors, ira byock, told us it costs up to $10,000 a day to maintain someone in the icu. >> this is the way so many americans die. something like 18% to 20% of americans spend their last days in an icu. and, you know, it's extremely expensive. it's uncomfortable. many times they have to be sedated so that they don't reflexively pull out a tube, or sometimes their hands are restrained. this is not the way most people would want to spend their last days of life. and yet this has become almost the medical last rites for, you know, people as they die. okay, le
want to make you money. my job is not just to educate you, but entertain you so call me at 800-743-cnbc. with the dow seek 95 points and the s&p dropping and at one point the selling was far worse and it looked like we could be in the midst of a major rollover. still today like yesterday, the buyers and sellers did real soul-searching, and what exactly are they pondering? basically, they're trying to figure out if good news about the economy is bad news for stocks or is the opposite the case, as the economy improves should we like stocks more? it's a first-class quandary that we have to dive into headlong on "mad money" if we're going to figure out the market's move. it's distracted and a parlor game and we find you the best stocks and the best opportunities. the only focus on the fed's next move the last three years, you missed some of the single best moments to invest in our lifetimes. i regard that as terrible. i regard it as shameful because this fed-centric world presumes that the market is one big stock that is sent higher or lower by ben bernanke and janet yellin and it's the mar
educational, personal and national debt than any other generation in history so they're just doing a cost calculation and saying it's not worth it. >> is some of this, by the way, your generation is better at computers and technology than my generation sure is. i'm a baby boom guy. is it because the website was so bad, so poorly designed and the president kind of lied about it? is that part of the issue here? just like uncool website? >> well, i don't think the president did himself any favors when he compared it to websites that millennials use every day like kayak and other websites where younger voters typically are because those websites work. those websites are clean. the interface doesn't crash and i think that it certainly didn't help from a cosmetic standpoint the president's argument that health care would be beneficial to everyone and would be working on time. >> all right. alex, another question. i'm trying to understand this whole issue. i mean, the guy's just got real bad numbers among one of his key constituencies which tells me there's great political change going on out th
. my job is not just to entertain but to educate you. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. battle stations! that's where we are on the eve of the hugely important labor department nonfarm payroll report that comes out tomorrow morning at 8:30 a.m. the stock market is telling us to be ready. we had our fifth straight decline today. dow seeking 68 points, nasdaq declining .12%. we know that's because there's been too much good data lately. it should be that, no, good data. because we are in a good news is bad news environment. this is good news moves interest rates higher. whether the fed likes it or not! remember, the fed wants rates down as more jobs can be created. but at a certain point, you have to ask, aren't more jobs being created? the fed stops trying to keep interest rates down or stops being able to. it's a fore gone conclusion the whole stock market will decline regardless of what the fed says or does. that's been the case before even as the last late run-up t.st going to be the case again. i'm not debating that. there are tons of reasons why stocks could. we know risk-free bonds that
to make you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you but to educate you. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. what a day. what a day this was! we got an employment number that had something for everyone. and it catapulted the averages higher. dow gaining 199 points. s&p falling 1.12% and the nasdaq climbing. stocks had been going down. for five days and the expectation that interest rates had to rise, because there would be such a huge burst of hiring. investors had been selling down their holding, they thought growth was too robust. instead we got a cinderella payroll employment number this morning that gave people a reason to stop selling bonds and to start -- >> buy, buy, buy! >> -- stocks, which had been dropping all week. it's a pretty amazing thing to watch. the same stocks that have been hammered going into the jobs report spring back to life. the banks, industrials, housing-related names, the consumer product stocks. almost as if they were all priced to a huge bond selloff which would've driven rates up, and when they didn't happen, we put the labor report under the cate
for a lot of public education programs to be part of this as they try to say to those boomers who are driving, you're not as responsive as you used to be in the past. let's see if we can make it safer for you on the roads. >> all right. now let's -- i could not believe this story when i heard it, we've labeled it the worst layover ever. a man that fell asleep on a flight, he woke up to find himself cold, and alone, in a dark locked plane. first of all, what happened and two, how does this happen? >> well, officially express jet, which is operating the flight for united airlines, says it is investigating what happened. but my favorite part of the story is listening to the man who was locked on the plane explain what happened when he woke up. listen to this. >> i woke up and i was like, looked up at the ceiling and i saw the lights were out. looked down the aisle, and nobody was home. >> i love it. i love it. because we've all been in that position where you're kind of groggy, wake up and look around and go where am i exactly. when we do it there's always somebody sitting next to u
to cramerica. my job is not just to educate but also to teach you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. to most private investors, the bad news is good news for stock story doesn't pass the smell test. saw that tweet this morning at 4:30 on the day where the dow gained 30 points and nasdaq advanced .15%. and it's always been like this. and the tweeter came back, so investing in stocks is bedding on the fed? is that why small investors always get in at the top? in other words, this guy just doesn't think the move is right. i think that the word right has to be the most expensive word in the english language. this is not an ethics class, people. it's not an exercise in some bizarre form of justice. it's not right or wrong! what seems obvious to me and incomprehensible to others. i sound like someone who wants to get away with something, while those who think it's not right somehow represent the true path of reason. how the heck did this happen? how could so many people feel like @paulkingsley? i think it's central to finding out the next leg of this market. it holds the key if stocks can rally hi
isn't the top priority here. maybe that's because in france, things like healthcare and education are virtually free. but if you think the french have unlocked the door to paradise, don't start packing yet. [sewing machines whirring] the 35-hour work week, meant to create new jobs, hardly made a dent in unemployment, which still stands at over 10%. and not everyone is thrilled about working even 35 hours. corrine maier, a part-time employee for the state-owned electricity company, has written a book arguing that the french should work less or at least less well. >> the aim is to keep your job without working, or to do... [laughs] it's not to go higher. >> maier's best seller, bonjour, laziness, reveals her secrets on the art of pretending to work. let me read you the subtitle of your book. "the art and necessity of doing the least possible in a corporation." what is the art? >> because you have to be an actor. >> so you're performing? >> yes, you're performing. >> did you have any idea when you wrote this book that it was going to be so popular with french people? >> uh, no. [laug
much in the malls. remember, our customer is fundamentally better educated and wealthier customer. in the malls in general, and, of course, our company is more upscale than the average. it clearly is impacting the big boxes. look at walmart, target, best buy, et cetera, where you see the direct impact. our customer -- our sales have been very strong. >> right. >> the industry, the mall industry has been quite strong over the last few years. >> bill? >> sorry. >> real quick, minimum wage, does taubman have a view on this? >> i don't have a view on it. it's a complicated subject. there's no question that most employees are not on minimum wage when you go the malls. generally above minimum wage particularly when you add commissions. there's no question it'll chill some job growth, but will it increases disposable income? that's out of my pay grade for sure. >> all right. we appreciate your time this morning. >>> all right. up next, budget committee member senator ron johnson on reducing the nation's regulatory burden, the tax system, also health care. he'll join us onset after the br
for their grandkids' educations... they chose a partner to help manage their wealth... one whose insights solutions, and approach have been relied on for over 200 years. that's the value of trusted connections. that's u.s. trust. thrusters at 30%! i can't get her to warp. losing thrusters. i need more power. give me more power! [ mainframe ] located. ge deep-sea fuel technology. a 50,000-pound, ingeniously wired machine that optimizes raw data to help safely discover and maximize resources in extreme conditions. our current situation seems rather extreme. why can't we maximize our... ready. ♪ ♪ brilliant. let's get out of here. warp speed. ♪ ♪ >>> welcome >>> welcome back. a new week on wall street, new batch of stories drawing eyeballs on our website. a look at what's leading the hot list. >> we just had a little excitement here on the website. you know that market downturn you've been talking about, the slide? check this out. we had at least about 6,000, 7,000 people just dive right into the site right into our market coverage, giving us a nice boost at the mar
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, going to have more resources for important thing like education and public safety. >> okay. in the "chicago tribune" an op ed written by governor scott walker of wisconsin. >> who? who? >> yeah, the guy sending me letters, everybody is welcome heading north. the long and short of it is, he didn't direct what you signed directly yesterday. but what he did underscore is that collective bargaining is no longer part of wisconsin based on act ten they passed, and at the time they passed it, the unemployment was both over 9% in wisconsin and illinois. it's good we slipped under, but wisconsin is 6.5, and they've turned into a slight surplus. you don't have an act ten. you didn't ban collective bargaining. >> no. >> are you going to have similar results, though? >> i believe in collective bargaining. we've created far more jobs than wisconsin. we created about 270,000 jobs. he promised 250,000 jobs. he's created 90,000 jobs in wisconsin. people don't go to sheboygan or, you know, places like that. they come to chicago and illinois. i think it's very important economy, that we work
forgot how it is done. are they supposed to people that have just fell off the turnip truck? >> well-educated people that are in the communist party or people who can't do well and fail. >> a fair point. >> what a story in the times over the weekend. duff a problem with the linear relationship between those hires and business? >> i'm still stuck upon the idea that when i got into business on wall street, it is kind of like when you apply to college. i remember when i applied to college, i said, you mean to tell me that 50% of the people that get in, their parents went here. that's outrageous. well, you know, what are you going to do, sue them? >> apparently, you can. >> here we are talking about jpmorgan and yet another potential problem. >> your point broadly, the jobs picture looks a little brighter. we are having persistently low inflation, which is worry some in its own right. >> go by clorox, the drugs. another camp said, go by parker hannafin. the world is accelerated. both want to put money to work. >> give me gilead. give me sysco, the right sysco. >> i think that inga is going to pul
is a tale of two economies, frankly. we are seeing a tremendous demand for highly educated, highly skilled jobs with a strong service component. so engineering. oil. financial services. and candidly, you know,er we're seeing that at levels we haven't seen almost since the late '90s. you know, we're almost reaching crazy levels, in terms of the bay area, for the war for engineering talent, and contrast that with the unskilled portion of the economy, which is not nearly enjoyed the recovery that the skilled portion of the economy has. and that is why, you know, unemployment has stayed above 7%, compared to the did, you know, under 5% that it was the last time that we sue this kind of crazy competition at the high end. >> yeah. saying that on a day when we're seeing protests around the country, arguing for minimum wage at fast-food restaurants, for instance. the last question, robert. yoo you are a veteran of expedia. you're a veteran of hotwire, of microsoft. everybody's tossing around whether or not mulally is going to go to microsoft or not. would he fit in the culture if he did? >> you kn
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)